It goes down when my G’s connect

Connecting Africa with its diaspora. Really, special shout out to social media for making this connection happen; never in a million years would we have been able to connect and share so quickly.

I think one thing that has held Africa back from exploring its full potential is that it is not really connected to its diaspora. Obviously, this is mostly due to our violent removal from the continent, it severed the natural links (it wasn’t like your family member was emigrating for work, they were literally stolen never to be seen.)

Some things thrived though. Religion, dance, love for colourful dressing, language to some extent; but food, food was enduring (and requires its own post). Basically, the essence of our Africanness continued to thrive even amongst the people who were violently taken away. We are an adaptable and elegant people. Have you seen the beauty of Afro-Latina’s hair and dressing, have you tried moqueca? Or creole cuisine? Caribbean cuisine is the only cuisine that appreciates really ata rodo.

We are collectively unpacking our trauma like never before. New thinking is arising. Philosophies are merging and emerging. Jollof wars are now international. Everyone loves alté culture. The world cannot resist our music. Have you seen when black people shake up whole industries? We are seeing more people that look like us in media and fashion and governments. More importantly, though, the resistance to oppression is getting louder and more visible. We are definitely united on that.

This post was just to thank social media for allowing us to document this profound moment in history.

Telling tenacious stories about the nuances of the lives of African millennials. At the intersex of history, technology, food, beauty and culture.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store